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In Response to Comment On: Why Racial Justice Matters in Radiation Oncology

Open AccessPublished:August 17, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adro.2020.07.016
      As Audre Lorde states, “we do not live single-issue lives,”
      • Lorde A.
      Learning from the 60s.
      and every co-author on this Advances article advocates on a range of issues that benefit others. In our Advances article,
      • Chapman C.H.C.
      • Gabeau D.
      • Pinnix C.C.
      • et al.
      Why racial justice matters in radiation oncology.
      we speak our truth. For this moment and for this time, the nation has paused to listen to a clarion call that has been made continually for 400 years, yet only audible when their way of life is disrupted by a sanitation workers strike, bus boycott, and now by the images of another Black man whose life was extinguished as they all watched—the stillness of the COVID pandemic allowing them some time to reflect.
      To assert one’s own humanity is never wrong and should not be perverted as a distraction. Even as we stand disenfranchised by this system, rather than sulk in misery we offer up our voices and provide solutions to a system that has not treated us fairly. We do as we have always done—build bridges and not divide. By introducing false dichotomies where they do not exist, the writer of this letter to the editor falls into the trap that has always been set by the institution of racism—divide and conquer.

      References

        • Lorde A.
        Learning from the 60s.
        in: Sister Outsider: Essays & Speeches. Crossing Press, Berkeley, CA2007: 138
        • Chapman C.H.C.
        • Gabeau D.
        • Pinnix C.C.
        • et al.
        Why racial justice matters in radiation oncology.
        Adv Rad Oncol. 2020; 5: 783-790